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Full text of "Chanute Air Force Base : 30 years of technical training"

629.13 
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U.S. Chanute Air Force Base, 111. 
30 Years of Technical Training. 

(1950?) 



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B. E. GATES 
Brigadier General, USAF 
Commanding 



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TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 

Map, Chanute Air Force Base 2 

Mission 5 

History 7 

School Staff y 

Courses, Technical School 11 

Department of Advanced Courses 13-25 

Department of Specialist Courses < 27-41 

Department of Aircraft Maintenance Officer Training . . . 43-49 

Department of Weather 51-63 

Department of Instructor Training 65-67 

Air Force R.O.T.C 68-69 

Use of Equipment 7u 



C0-067--AF-Chanute AFB, 111. 9-12-00 200 



MISSION AND ORGANIZATION 

The primary mission of Chanute Air Force Base is to pro- 
vide formal technical training for both officers and airmen of 
the United States Air Force in the fields of weather, special- 
ized aircraft mechanics, aircraft maintenance and certain trade 
or craftsman courses such as sheet metal, weiding, machinist, 
woodworking, etc. In addition to Air Force personnel, officers 
and men from other branches of our Armed Services as well as 
foreign students are selected to attend courses in the Technical 
School. 

In order to carry out this mission under the Wing-Base pat- 
tern of organization, direct supervision over the operation of 
the Technical School is vested in the Primary Mission Group or 
the 3345th Technical Training Group. 

For administrative efficiency in the operation of the school 
and the conduct of the various courses required, the school is 
organized into five (5) departments, each one of which will be 
discussed later in this booklet followed by a brief account of 
the courses conducted. 

For administrative control over personnel, including stu- 
dents, staff and instructors, the Group is organized into a 
Headquarters Squadron, five (5) Instructor Squadrons and fifteen 
(15) Student Squadrons to provide for the maximum student load. 

Insofar as practicable, students are assigned to squadrons 
homogeneous to the courses being pursued. The student's status 
and progress in school is monitored at the squadron level to pro- 
vide for the maximum guidance and counseling to enable him to 
successfully complete his course. 

In the last analysis, the true test of whether or not the 
Technical School is accomplishing its mission is determined by 
the calibre of its product - our graduates - and how well they 
perform in the field. 

Chanute graduates of the past have established high standards 
of technical proficiency and good maintenance. For the future 
there is great pride and confidence that these traditions of past 
performance will be maintained without fail. 




WELCOME 



CHANUTE AIR FORCE BASE IN RETROSPECT 

Chanute Air Force Base, home of the oldest and one of the 
leading Technical Schools in the Air Force, was established in 
1917 to train pilots for World War I. July 18, 1917 marks the 
date when a dozen Curtis "Jennies" with an instructor and stu- 
dent in each took off as the first class of formal instruction 
at this station. 

In 1921 the "Army Enlisted Mechanic School" was establish- 
ed at Chanute when mechanic and technician courses were transfer- 
red from Kelly Field, Texas. During the following year (1922), 
the Photography School at Langley Field, Virginia and the Air Ser- 
vice Communications School, Ft. Sill, Oklahoma, were added to the 
Technical Training Program at this base. Thus, we see that the 
original school embraced the fields of mechanics, photography, 
communications and armament. 

In 1924 a clerical school was added to the curricula, but 
this activity along with photographic and armament training were 
transferred to Lowry Field, Colorado in 1938. 

1938 marked the beginning of the expansion program when an 
appropriation of eight and one-half million dollars ($8,500,000. 
00) was made for the construction of modern facilities. Build- 
ings constructed as a result of this appropriation include all 
the centrally located brick living quarters, a modern hospital, 
a test blocks building, and the three large hangars. The follow- 
ing year another appropriation was made for the construction of 
an additional hangar which is now designated as hangar #3 and is 
somewhat smaller than the original three. 

The peak period for the training of personnel in technical 
skills was reached during the war years (1940 - 1945) when over 
200,000 men were graduated from the various courses. 

Since the termination of the war and up to date, the school 
has passed through the post war era with a student load averaging 
around 3000 students enrolled in over forty different courses, 
reaching an all time high for peace time with over 5000 students 
in school under the expanded program of 1949 and 1950. 

Since the origin of technical training at this base in 1921, 
many changes have taken place both in the scope of courses offered 
and concept of training to meet ever changing demands and require- 
ments of the Air Force. This school has every reason to be proud 
of the contribution it has made and the vital part it has played 
in the development of the United States Air Force. 



ORIENTATION 




TECHNICAL SCHOOL STAFF 

3345th TECHNICAL TRAINING GROUP 




PERS. ADJUTANT 




CAPT B R SORENSON 




MAJ J.CPEDERSON 



A. M. 0. T. ADV. COURSES 



GROUP COMMANDER 1 



Cs 




COL.W.E.THURMAN 



EXECUTIVE OFFICER 




4*. 



LTCOL.RB.CHARRON 



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MA J RE WHITTAKER 



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LTCOL.EE SNYDER 




1 



MATERIEL 






CAPT EL GALLIA 




YCAP.UJALEXANDER 



1 



SPECIALISTS! INSTR. TNG 



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MAJ. IE RUBY 




EUTRY INTO SCHOOL 



10 



CRANUTE AFB TECHNICAL COURSES 

A total of approximately forty-five (45) courses (including 
special training and reserve force courses) are offered at this 
base. These courses are grouped, insofar as possible, into their 
respective occupational areas and each group assigned to one of 
five (5) major school departments for administrative purposes. 
These school departments are listed below along with the courses 
given within each department. It may be noted that throughout 
the written and pictorial descriptions of the individual courses 
of instruction, no attempt has been made to describe each of the 
very similar courses; instead, one general description is given 
to cover each of such groups. As an example: one general descrip- 
tion is included to depict technical instruction given in all of 
approximately nine (9) power plant mechanic courses. 

I. Department of Advanced Courses. 

a. Airplane Instrument Mechanic Courses. 

b. Airplane Electrical Mechanic Courses. 

c. Airplane Propeller Mechanic Courses. 

d. Airplane Hydraulic Mechanic Courses. 

e. Airplane Power Plant Mechanic Courses. 

f. Airplane Turbosupercharger Repairman. 

II. Department of Specialist Courses. 

a. Airplane Sheet Metal Worker. 

b. Machinist. 

c. Aircraft Welder. 

d. Personal Equipment Technician. 

e. Airplane Woodworker. 

f. Fabric and Dope Mechanic. 

g. Synthetic Trainer Mechanic, Flying and Landing. 

III. Department of Aircraft Maintenance Officer Training. 

a. Aircraft Maintenance Officer Courses. 

b. Flight Engineer (Ground Phase). 

c. Advanced Mechanical Accessories and Equipment 
Repair. 

IV. Department of Weather. 

a. Weather Engineering and Survey Officer. 

b. Weather Forecaster. 

c. Weather Observer Courses. 

d. Rawinsonde Operator. 

e. Rawinsonde Technician. 

f . High Altitude Forecaster. 

V. Department of Instructor Training, 
a. Technical Instructor. 

In addition to the formal courses listed above, an annual 
R.O.T.C. encampment provides special training for college men during 
their summer vacation. This special training, at this base,, is con- 
fined to the field of aircraft maintenance. 

11 




AIRPLANE MECHANIC 



12 



ADVANCED COURSES 



* 



* 



Training in the Department of Advanced 
Courses is of two types. One is the advanced 
or up-grade training of qualified Airplane and 
Engine Mechanics to either Instrument, Elec- 
trical, Hydraulic, Propeller, Power Plant or 
Turbosupercharger mechanics. The second type 
of training is the further specialization of 
airmen, who are qualified in one of the spe- 
cialties listed above, in some specific system 
of that specialty. 



* 




13 



AIRPLANE INSTRUMENT MECHANIC, COURSE NO. 68600 

This course is designed to give advanced training to air- 
plane and engine mechanics in the maintenance and repair of 
airplane instruments and related equipment. 

Graduates of the course are trained to inspect, test, cali- 
brate, adjust and make minor repairs of airplane instruments, 
including automatic pilot equipment. 

Special training instrument courses are given on the types 
C-i , F-i and F-2, E-4, and E-6 automatic pilots for advanced 
students . 




Demonstrating Air Position Indicator System 
Maintenance Procedures 



14 




Instructor Supervising a Student Bench Testing 
an Airspeed Indicator 




Students Trouble Shooting an k- 4 Autopilot System 
Under Instructor Supervision 



15 



AIRPLANE ELECTRICAL MECHANIC, COURSES NOS. 685OO AND 68512 

Course No. 685OO is designed to give advanced training to quali- 
fied airplane and engine mechanics in the maintenance and repair of 
aircraft electrical systems other than communications equipment. 
Graduates of the course are trained to inspect, test, adjust, make 
minor repairs of electrical equipment, and trouble shoot electrical 
circuits with the aid of blueprints. 

Course No. 68512 is designed to give training to selected air- 
plane electrical mechanics in alternating current systems. Training 
involves the installation, adjustment, inspection and maintenance of 
alternating current electrical units and systems. 




This Student is Locating Troubles in a Landing 
Gear Warning System Trainer 



16 




Locating Troubles in an Airplane Generator System 



17 



AIRPLANE PROPELLER MECHANIC, COURSE NO. 687OC 

This course is designed to give advanced training to se- 
lected airplane and engine mechanics in field and organization- 
al maintenance and repair of airplane propellers and propeller 
control systems. 

Graduates are trained to remove, install, balance, inspect, 
trouble shoot, service, and replace worn or defective parts of 
electrically and/or hydraulically operated propellers, governors 
synchronizers, and de-icing or anti-icing svstems. 




Students Installing a Propeller 
on a F-82 Airplane 



18 




Inspection of B- 50 Propeller Control System 




Load Test of the (Jurtiss Electric Propeller 



19 



AIRPLANE HYDRAULIC MECHANIC, COURSE NO. 528OO 

This course is designed to give advanced training to se- 
lected airplane and engine mechanics in the maintenance and re- 
pair of airplane hvdraulic units and systems. 

Graduates of this course are trained to repair, service, 
inspect, trouble shoot and adjust hydraulic units and systems 
used to actuate such aircraft equipment as landing gear, wheel 
brakes, bomb bay doors, wing flaps, and oxvgen and fire extin- 
guishing equipment. 




Instructor Explaining the Operation of the Hydraulic Accumulato 



20 




Instructor Demonstrating the Operation of F- 80 Hydraulic System 




Disassembly of Shimmy Damper, F- 80 Airplane 



21 



AIRPLANE POWER PLANT MECHANIC, 
RECIPROCATING AND JET ENGINE TYPES 

These specialized courses are designed to give advanced 
training in the maintenance and repair of specific types and 
makes of airplane engines and their accessories. 

Graduates of any of these courses are trained to inspect, 
service, adjust and make minor repairs on the engine and such 
accessories as carburetors, fuel pumps, ignition units, fuel 
nozzles, etc. of the particular type of power plant on which 




Motoring Over the J - 47 Engine to Check Its Drip Valve and the 
Amperage Output of the Auxiliary Power Plant 



22 




Instruction in the Operating Principles of the 
Pratt h Whitney R-4360 Engine 




Instruction in the Construction and Operation 
of the Turbo-jet J-35 Engine 



23 



AIRPLANE TURBOSUPERCHARGER REPAIRMAN, 
COURSE NO. 96401 

Instruction in this course is offered to qualified airmen 
who are to perform depot maintenance on the turbosupercharger, 
as well as organizational and field maintenance on electric 
regulators and electronic control systems. 

This course is designed to train students to perform re- 
moval, inspections, maintenance, overhaul, repair and instal- 
lation of the latest types and models of turbosuperchargers 
and to perform inspections, adjustments, trouble shooting and 
maintenance of turbosupercharger electric regulator and elec- 
tronic control systems. 




Learning Maintenance Procedures Used on the 

B- 29 Airplane Turbosupercharger 

Electronic Control System 



24 




Disassembly of Tu rbo supe rchar ger for Inspection, 
Repair, Overhaul, and Dynamic Balancing 




Individual Instruction in the Operation of the Waste Gate Motor 
of the Electric Tu rbosupe rcha r ge r Control System 



25 




SHEET METAL 



26 



SPECIALIST COURSES 



* 

* 
* 
* 



Training in the Department of Specialist 
Courses is, with one exception, entirely within 
the Installation and Construction Engineering 
Occupational Area. Here, entering students with 
entrance qualifications of "basic airmen" are 
given training in one of the following courses: 

Airplane Sheet Metal Worker 

Machinist 

Aircraft Welder 

Personal Equipment Technician 

Airplane Woodworker 

Fabric and Dope Mechanic 

One other course is offered basic airmen 
in this department; Synthetic Trainer Mechanic, 
Flying and Landing. Training in this course is 
in the Electronic Engineering Occupational Area. 

An explanation of training within the 
courses of this department follows: 




27 



AIRPLANE SHEET METAL WORKER, 
COURSE NO. 55500 

This course is designed to give training, to basic air- 
men in the inspection and maintenance of airplane sheet metal 
parts. The instruction covers heat treatment of metals, 
structural repairs, general airplane metal work and fuel cell 
and plexiglas maintenance and repair. 




Repairing Trailing Edge of an Aileron 



28 




Preparing to Install a New Wing Rib 




This Student is Assisting Another in the Installation 
of a Fuselage Skin Patch 



29 



MACHINIST, COURSE NO. 11400 

The machinist course is designed to give training to 
basic airmen in the manufacture of metal parts and tools 
using machine shop equipment. The trainee is taught to 
read blueprints, select metal stock, layout work, and 
machine the material to close tolerances using hand tools 
and power-driven machines such as lathes, milling machines, 
shapers, contour cutting machines, drill presses and pre- 
cision grinders. 




Learning the Technique of Cutting 
Helical Gear Teeth 



30 




Demonstrating the Method of Taper Boring on a Lathe 




Learning to do Irregular Cutting on the Contour Machine 



31 



AIRCRAFT WELDER, COURSE NO. 57300 

In the aircraft welder course the basic airman is taught 
gas and electric welding techniques, heat treating and the ap- 
plication of these skills to aircraft maintenance and repair. 




Spot Welding a Jet Engine Inner Flame Tube 



32 




Practice in Engine Mount Welding Techniques 




Demonstrating the Correct Procedure for Quenching a 
High Carbon Steel Lathe Center 



33 



PERSONAL EQUIPMENT TECHNICIAN, 
COURSE NO. S940 

This course is designed to train basic airmen to perform 
organizational and field maintenance of parachutes, pneumatic 
and personal protective and emergency equipment. This in- 
volves, in addition to parachute maintenance, such specific 
items of equipment as electrically heated flying clothing, 
single and multiplace life rafts and accessory kits, flyer's 
armor, anti-G suits, life vests, emergency sustenance kits and 
oxygen equ ipmen t . 




Performing a 10-Day Inspection on Parachutes Stored in Aircraft 



34 




Inspecting Safety Belts 




Instruction on Oxygen Equipment Maintenance 



35 



AIRPLANE WOODWORKER, COURSE NO. 55000 

This course is designed to train basic airmen to perform 
organizational and field maintenance of wooden airplane parts 
and assemblies. Graduates of this course are trained to work 
from sketches and drawings and fabricate wooden replacement 
parts for aircraft using correct woodworking techniques and 
procedures. 




Using a Disc Sander to Form a Rib 
to the Correct Contour 



36 




Learning the Correct Construction 
of Wooden Wings 




Making Drawings of Parts to be Made in the Woodworking Shop 

37 



FABRIC AND DOPE MECHANIC, 
COURSE NO. 54800 

This course is designed to train basic airmen to replace 
and repair aircraft fabric covers as required in organizational 
and field maintenance. This involves the application of patches 
to small tears and rips, cutting and fitting canvas over air- 
plane fuselages and control surfaces, and the apDlication of the 
dope protective coatings. 




Finish Spraying a Fabric Covered Fuselage 



38 




Demonstrating the Correct Procedure for the Preparation of 
a National Star Insignia for Spray Painting 




Learning the Proper Use of the Sewing Machine 



39 



SYNTHETIC TRAINER MECHANIC, FLYING AND LANDING, 
COURSE NO. 96906 

In this course basic airmen are trained in the installation, 
maintenance and adjustment of the instrument flying and landing 
trainers AN-T-18 and C-8 . Graduates are trained to clean, lubri- 
cate, calibrate, adjust and test equipment to assure proper func- 
tioning, and to locate and correct malfunctioning by repairing or 
replacing defective parts. 



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Electrical Circuit Trouble Shooting on a 
Flying and Landing Trainer 



40 







Learning a Circuit of the Flying and Landing Trainer 




Getting Acquainted with the Mechanical Linkages of the 
Flying and Landing Trainer 



41 




STUDENT EN 

OFFICER 



42 



AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE 
OFFICER TRAINING 



* 

• 
* 



The Department of Aircraft Maintenance 
Officer Training consists of three courses. 
For selected officer personnel, training is 
given in: 

Aircraft Maintenance Officer Courses. 

Airmen with an SSN of 747 or higher are 
given advanced or up-grade training in one of 
the following courses: 

Flight Engineer (Ground Phase). 
Advanced Mechanical Accessories and 
Equipment Repair. 




43 



AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE OFFICER, 
COURSE NO. 48230 

This course is designed to train and qualify officers 
as aircraft maintenance officers for duty as supervisors of 
organizational and field maintenance activities in Air Force 
organizations. Instruction in this course includes such sub- 
jects as Administration and Management, Air Force Shop Func- 
tions, Airplane Structures, Miscellaneous Systems and Ground 
Equipment, Direct and Alternating Current Electrical Systems 
and Instruments, Electronic Systems and Equipment, Airplane 
Power Plants, Operation and Cruise Control, Engine Change 
and Inspections, and Weight and Balance Control. 




Tracing the Flow of Hydraulic Fluid in a 
Typical Hydraulic System 



44 




Demonstration of the Operation of the F-80 Fuel System 




Completing Valve Check After Overhaul 



45 



FLIGHT ENGINEER (GROUND PHASE), 
COURSE NO. 73700 

This course is designed to give training to selected 
personnel with entrance qualifications of airplane and 
engine mechanic or airplane power plant mechanic in organ- 
izational maintenance and inspection of very heavy multi- 
engine airplane and controlling the performance of such 
airplanes during flight. 




Flight Engineer Coordination Training Using Multiple 
Flight Engineer Panels 



46 




Demonstrating the Constructional Features of an R- 4360 Engine 

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Operation and Construction Features, of the Tu rbo sup e r ch a r ge r 



47 



ADVANCED MECHANICAL ACCESSORIES AND EQUIPMENT REPAIR, 

COURSE NO. 42430 

In this course, selected airmen (airplane and engine me- 
chanics or higher) are given training in organizational and 
field maintenance of such accessories and equipment as: 

Airplane Air Conditioning Systems 

Oxygen Systems 

Heating, Ventilating and Cabin Pressurizing Systems 

Anti-Icing and Defogging Systems 

Fire Detecting and Fire Extinguishing Systems 

Ground Heating, Ventilating and Cooling Equipment 

Cabin Pressure Test Equipment 




Operating the Regulator of the Oxygen Systet 






48 







Demonstrating the Operation of the Engine 
Fire Extinguishing System 




Learning the Line Hook-Up Procedure in a 
Low Pressure Oxygen System 



49 




WEATHER 



50 



WEATHER 



* 

* 



The mission of the Department of Weather 
is to train officers and airmen for duty in all 
branches of the weather field. The courses 
conducted are designed to give basic and up- 
grade-training in the observing, analysis, and 
forecasting of weather phenomena; and in the 
operation and maintenance of electronic and non- 
electronic equipment used in the observing, re- 
cording and transmission of weather data. 

Courses offered to officers in this depart- 
ment are: 

Weather Engineering and Sui /ey Officer 
High Altitvde Forecaster 

Courses offered to airmen include: 

Weather Forecaster 
Weather Observer 
Rawin sonde Operator 
Rawinsonde Technician 
High Altitude Forecaster 

An explanation of training within the 
courses of this department follows: 




51 






WEATHER ENGINEERING AND SURVEY OFFICER, 
COURSE NO. 52053 

This course is designed to train qualified weather officers 
for the supervision of procurement, installation, and maintenance 
of all types of weather equipment at Group or higher level. 

Graduates are trained to direct and supervise the requisition, 
storage, and issue of all weather equipment and supplies. They 
should be able to conduct field tests and recommend modification 
or improvements to weather equipment, as well as organize, direct, 
and supervise units for the installation and maintenance of such 
equipment as rawinsonde, ceilometer, and weather radar installa- 
tions. 




Servicing the Rawin Set AN/GMD- 1 



52 




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53 



WEATHER FORECASTER, COURSE NO. 78700 

This course is designed to qualify Weather Observers for 
duties involving the preparation of local, area, and route 
forecasts and to include the weather briefing of air crews. 
Graduates are trained to prepare, interpret, and evaluate cli- 
matological data, prepare and analyze surface, upper air, and 
associated meteorological charts; and prepare local, route, 
and area forecasts. 







Map Analysis in Weather Training Station 



54 




Classroom Instruction in Map Analysis 




Classroom Instruction in Map Analysis 



55 



WEATHER OBSERVER, COURSE NO. 78400 

This weather course is designed to qualify specially se- 
lected basic airmen in the operation and operator maintenance 
of non-electronic weather equipment and in the observing, re- 
cording, and transmission of weather data. 

Graduates are trained to operate and maintain such mete- 
orological equipment as barographs, anemometers, and ceilometers 
and will be able to transmit and receive by facsimile and tele- 
typewriter. They will be able to observe, classify, record and 
encode or decode all types of weather phenomena. 




Making Observations of Visual Weather Elements 



56 




Weather Instruments Classroom 




Taking Surface Weather Observations 



57 



RAWINSONDE OPERATOR, COURSE NO. 9 4200 

This course is designed to train qualified Weather Observers 
in upper air observations by means of rawinsonde equipment. 

Graduates are trained to determine and prepare for transmis- 
sion data concerning wind, temperature, pressure, and relative 
humidity at various heights in the atmosphere through the use of 
radiosonde and rawinsonde equipment. 




Releasing Kawinsonde Flight Equipment 



58 



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Operating the SCR-658, Rawinsonde Equipment 




Receiving and Computing Data in Rawinsonde Observation 



59 



RAWINSONDE TECHNICIAN, COURSE NO. 78202 

The first part of the training in this course (Radio Funda- 
mentals) is conducted at Scott AFB, Illinois. The second part of 
the training (Chanute AFB phasei is based upon the application of 
the radio fundamentals knowledge to specialized rawinsonde equip- 
ment. Graduates are trained to install, inspect, and maintain all 
rawinsonde equipment including recorders, transmitters, antennae, 
and receivers. 




Trouble Shooting and Calibrating the Radiosonde Receptor 



60 





Laboratory Instruction in Servicing the Receiver-Indicator 




Classroom Instruction on Radio Set SCR-65! 



61 



HIGH ALTITUDE FORECASTER, COURSE NO. 82197 

Training is offered in this course to selected officers and 
airmen who are qualified Weather Officers and Forecasters. 

This is a special course designed to qualify graduates for 
duties involving forecasting for high altitude flights. 

Graduates are trained to analyze and forecast weather phe- 
nomena including the jet stream in the vicinity of the tropopause 




A Study of Upper Level Wind Speed 



62 




Classroom Instructor on Upper Air Chart 





INSTRUCTOR 



64 



INSTRUCTOR TRAINING 



* 



* 
• 



This department operates one course the 
function of which is to train airmen and of- 
ficers who are qualified in a technical spe- 
cialty in the methods and techniques of teach- 
ing that specialty. 



* 




65 



TECHNICAL INSTRUCTOR, COURSF NO. 75100 

Specific subjects of training within this course are: 
oral expression, study habits, effective learning, teaching 
methods and techniques, classroom and student management, 
instructional aids, lesson planning, grading and testing, 
and practice teaching. 




instruction in the Use ot Visual Aids in Teaching 



66 




Giving a Practice Lecture for Student Analysis and Discussion 




Use of the Tape Recorder in Speech Training 



67 



AIR FORCE R.O.T.C. ENCAMPMENT 

This training is based upon ell phases of 
the Aircraft Maintenance Officer Specialty. 




R.O.T.C. Students in Military Training 



68 




R. 0. T. C. Students Receiving Welding Instruction 




X 



N 




R. O. T. C. Picnic During Summer Encampment 



69 



THE USE OF EQUIPMENT IN TRAINING 

Throughout the foregoing section (Chanute AFE Technical 
Courses), it may be noted that the illustrations depicting in- 
structional situations in the various courses show a wide variety 
of equipment used in many different ways. Some of the more fre- 
quent uses to which aircraft equipment is put are as: 

Cut-aways to show internal construction. 
Items for disassembly and assembly purposes. 
Equipment for use in bench testing. 
Items for removal and installation practice. 
Assemblies of equipment and parts to comprise working 
replicas (trainers) of airplane systems. 

As a further explanation of the uses to which trainers are 
put, a general discussion of the following is included: 

The Need for Trainers: In most instances the development of 
a trainer is brought about by the need of the classroom instructor 
for an aid in the teaching of some airplane system. 

Types of Trainers: Trainers are prepared to show the equip- 
ment employed in a particular airplane system, to include common 
troubles for diagnosis" and correction, and as complete operating 
replicas. 

Common Trainer Systems: When new types of aircraft are manu- 
factured, trainers are usually prepared to give technical instruc- 
tion on: 

Hydraulic systems (may be one or several systems) . 

Electrical systems. 

Instrument systems. 

Fuel systems. 

Oxygen systems (when they are different from ordinary types) 

Fire extinguishing systems. 

Assist take-off systems. 

Heating, ventilating and pressurizing systems. 

New and different features such as: 

Auto dive brakes. 

Pilot ejection seat. 

Slats. 
Engine cutaways and exploded models. 

Size of Trainers: Trainers may vary in size from quite small 
up to large wheel or caster mounted items approximately 6 feet in 
height, up to 8 feet in length in any one detachable section, and 
in the vicinity of 4 feet in width. These dimensions cannot be ex- 
ceeded since all trainers must be of a size to move through regular 
doorways and to be transportable by air. 

Number of Trainers Employed: There are approximately 1550 train- 
ers in use throughout the schools of this base. Of this number, 1400 
were manufactured in the Training Aids Section of this school and 150 
are standard trainers. 

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GRADUATION 



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UNIVERSITY Of ILLINOIS-URBAN* 



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